Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Learn about natural tecalligator-09_smallhniques for cleansing and conserving stormwater for humans and wildlife, at any scale–backyard to campus to region. Our bayous and bays are greatly impacted by the quality of the stormwater flowing into them, and now is a great time to start improving it with practices we can implement at home, at school, or beyond.

The workshop is open to everyone, with particular focus on educators. TCWP demonstrates many years of partnering with schools and educators to produce innovative sites with a positive impact on water quality and wildlife.

Join us on Saturday, March 4, in a beautiful setting–the Gulf Coast Bird Observatory‘s new LEED-certified building in Lake Jackson, TX. Continue Reading »

Mustin7

If you want a natural environment for your yard, nature has already created the perfect landscape ecosystem template for you to copy. A good place to start if you want to attract wildlife to your yard is to group similar plants together in your landscape to mimic nature. Continue Reading »

Other than planting native plants and eliminating the use of fertilizers and pesticides you can also install a rainwater harvesting system and plant a rain garden.  Continue Reading »

Heritage Park Rain Garden 3.jpg

A rain garden is a bowl-shaped depression designed as a garden to capture, hold, and absorb rainwater. Rain gardens slow the flow of rainwater from roofs, sidewalks, streets, parking lots, and other impervious surfaces, allowing the water to penetrate the soil. Continue Reading »

Composting

Compost in Hand - notillbed5

Composting is the easy way to add nutrients to soil, improve soil structure and increase the moisture-holding ability of soil. Composting recycles organic material through controlled decomposition. Organic materials are grass and yard clippings, kitchen scraps (no animal products), wood shavings, cardboard and paper. As organic materials decompose they turn into a rich, dark humus material that improves all soil types.

Compost helps sandy soil retain water and nutrients that would normally wash right through and it breaks up tight clay soils allowing roots to spread and oxygen to penetrate. Soils improved with compost contain beneficial microorganisms that protect plants from diseases and pests. Compost can reduce or eliminate the use of synthetic fertilizers in your lawn or garden. Better moisture retention means less watering and reduced runoff pollution – two key elements of WaterSmart gardening.