Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘conservation’

 

AUT_0022

I-45 in Galveston County.   A neighborhood of isolation with a high per-capita destruction of native prairie.

We have all heard the Harvey wakeup call. We all know we can’t continue business as usual. We have to change our ways. We will in fact be “the city that floods” unless we stop being the “city of no limits.”

Unlike previous storms, every one of us knows personally someone who was flooded out of their house. This storm will long remain with us. The Harvey aftermath will last much longer than previous storms—and thus will provide a longer “teachable moment” for us to think about our future. Let’s make this teachable moment about much more than flooding. Maybe thinking about how to be a great city will help us deal more rationally with the flooding as well. (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Workshop flyer-final

Our bayous and bays are greatly impacted by the quality of the stormwater flowing into them, and now is a great time to start improving it with practices we can implement at home, work, or beyond.

Join us in a beautiful setting–the Gulf Coast Bird Observatory’s new LEED-certified building in Lake Jackson, TX.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Review of: Fields and Streams. Stream restoration, neoliberalism, and the future of environmental science. Rebecca Lave. The University of Georgia Press. 2012.

Image

David Rosgen is perhaps the best known practitioner of stream restoration in the United States, and perhaps beyond. His method, Natural Channel Design, is specified in many state and federal agency-funded projects. This method in fact is specified by the Harris County Flood Control District for the Memorial Park Demonstration Project, a “restoration” of an unchannelized segment of Buffalo Bayou on the southern flanks of Memorial Park, in Houston. (more…)

Read Full Post »