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Archive for the ‘native plants’ Category

To attract wildlife to your landscape, you need to provide them with food, water, shelter, and places to raise their young. Feeders, birdbaths, and native plants can help you meet these needs and create a haven for wildlife in your backyard. (more…)

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A WaterSmart landscapes focuses on three main principles: conserving water, improving water quality and providing habitat for wildlife. This is achieved by using native and adapted plants, using little to no fertilizers and pesticides, utilizing less water and requiring less maintenance. There are many different types of WaterSmart landscape options for you to choose from to implement in your yard. Many of your local parks have WaterSmart gardens for you to look at for inspiration. Some of these landscape inspirations may include: rain gardens, native plants, rainwater harvesting systems, vegetated buffers, and permeable walkways and driveways. (more…)

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Picture1Native plants are local and occur naturally without human help in a given area. Many have thrived there for centuries. There are different types of native plants, including flowers, shrubs, trees, grasses and vines that you can use in your landscape.  (more…)

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Black Eyed Susan DSC_3563Water restrictions may be a way of life for some time, yet, this does not mean our landscapes must evolve into gravel and cactus. It is time to take a new look at how we prepare and maintain our landscapes making them more resilient and more WaterSmart, especially during our hot summer months. (more…)

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Armand Bayou Nature Center (3)From sprinkler to storm drain, from bayou to bay, the water used to maintain your yard remains untreated. What you do to your lawn and what runs off it determines the health of your local bayou and Galveston Bay. Runoff from residential areas in the Galveston Bay watershed is the No. 1 source of water pollution in most of our bayous. However, you can take steps to reduce the pollution that flows off your yard by adopting WaterSmart practices.

WaterSmart landscapes

A WaterSmart yard uses plants and practices that require little or no fertilizers or pesticides and less water than conventional lawns. With minimal grass cover and maximum use of native and adapted plants, the WaterSmart landscape can be beautiful, easy to maintain, and environmentally friendly.

WaterSmart landscapes can reduce the amount of polluted runoff entering the storm drain system by 90 percent. They can also cut the amount of water you use for irrigation by 90 percent. By converting your lawn one section at a time, you can create a landscape that helps preserve the bay area and gradually reduces your maintenance time. (more…)

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